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Preface to Some Eighteenth Century Tracts


EDITORIAL NOTE

The editor of this volume, William Kenneth Boyd (1879-1938), was one of the premier historians of North Carolina and the South during the first half of the twentieth century. He taught at Trinity College (later Duke University) from 1907 until his death, and was a prolific writer and editor. Some Eighteenth Century Tracts was among his most important contributions to the historical literature of the state.

Selected tracts will be included in this electronic edition, from among the fourteen in Boyd's volume.


SOME EIGHTEENTH CENTURY TRACTS

CONCERNING

NORTH CAROLINA

WITH INTRODUCTIONS AND NOTES

BY

WILLIAM K. BOYD, PH.D.

PROFESSOR OF HISTORY, DUKE UNIVERSITY

(RALEIGH, NORTH CAROLINA HISTORICAL COMMISSION 1927)


PREFACE

In all the literature pertaining to the history of North Carolina, no titles are scarcer than pamphlets and broadsides printed before 1800. This is undoubtedly explained by the fact that there were no printing presses in the colony prior to 1749, that the editions of all publications in the eighteenth century were small, and that there were no libraries or institutions which made a business of preserving contemporary printed records. However, a number of pamphlets and broadsides were issued, some of them from presses in other colonies or states. While searching for material relating to the South Atlantic region in the larger institutions and foundations of the Northeast, it was my fortune to disclose a number of such publications of which not more than two copies of any one are known to exist, and none whatever are preserved in the collections in North Carolina. These together with one pamphlet in the possession of the University of North Carolina (Maurice Moore's Justice and Policy of taxing the Colonies in Great Britain), one in the collections of the North Carolina Historical Commission (George Micklejohn's Sermon), and two manuscripts also in those collections (the Searcy Petition and the Sims Address), one tract in the British Museum (John Rutherfurd's Importance of the Colonies to Great Britain), and also one printed by George Harding (Henry McCulloh's Miscellaneous Representations), are here reprinted. I trust that they may be of service to scholars and useful to the general reader in forming more definite impressions concerning politics and economics in North Carolina during the eighteenth century. I should add that all these have also been reprinted serially in the North Carolina Historical Review (January 1925 to January 1927, inclusive) and that except for a few changes and corrections in the introductions, the content of the volume is identical with the serial series.

I am deeply indebted to the authorities of the institutions and libraries in which these pamphlets are preserved for permission to make the reprints, and also to various individuals for valuable assistance in securing information for some of the introductions. This obligation is more specifically noted in each introduction. I also wish to express my indebtedness to the University of Pennsylvania, for it was the tenure of a Harrison Research Fellowship at that institution which made possible the collection of these pamphlets and other materials pertaining to the history of the South Atlantic region.

WILLIAM K. BOYD

Durham, N. C.
March 7, 1927.


SELECTED TRACTS

William Borden's Addresses to the People and the Burgesses (1746)

John Rutherfurd on the Importance of the Colonies to Great Britain (1761)

Henry McCulloh's Representations Relative to the Colonies (1761)

Informations Concerning North Carolina (1773)



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